July212014
mademoisellelapiquante:

Portrait of a Lady identified as Christina of Denmark, Dowager-Duchess of Milan and Lorraine (1521-1590) (detail) | c. 1568-1572

mademoisellelapiquante:

Portrait of a Lady identified as Christina of Denmark, Dowager-Duchess of Milan and Lorraine (1521-1590) (detail) | c. 1568-1572

12PM

dailyart-i-facts:

Favorite Artists in No Particular Order: (1/10)

Filippo Lippi, Madonna and Child with Two Angels

July202014
mademoisellelapiquante:

Portrait of a Woman (detail) by Bruyn | 1539

mademoisellelapiquante:

Portrait of a Woman (detail) by Bruyn | 1539

12PM
mademoisellelapiquante:

Portrait of a Lady (detail) |  Peter de Kempeneer | 1550

mademoisellelapiquante:

Portrait of a Lady (detail) |  Peter de Kempeneer | 1550

July192014

welltemperedklavier:

image

Scenes from the Life of St. Francis (Scene 9), Benozzo Gozzoli, 1452

(Source: lionofchaeronea)

12PM
electronicgallery:

"Die Melancholie" (Melancholy) by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1532

Lucas Cranach the Elder’s Melancholy certainly draws its inspiration from an engraving executed by Dürer on the same subject in 1514. A theme often examined in art works since antiquity, melancholy, or melancholia, derives from the medical theory of four humours, whereby disease or ailments were thought to be caused by an imbalance in one or another of the four basic bodily fluids, or humours. In contrast to its negative connotations during the Middle Ages, this condition was equated during the Renaissance with the artistic temperament. In fact, many considered melancholy to be the catalyst for all artistic creation. Cranach makes use of Dürer’s motifs, but transposes them to illustrate one of Martin Luther’s sermons, which aimed to denounce this ailment as an indication that the afflicted individual was under the influence of Satan. Drink and nourishment were essential to counteract its effects.
More than any other painter of his time, Lucas Cranach the Elder (Cranach, 1472–Weimar, 1553) was heavily influenced by the ideas of Martin Luther, one of whose main proponents and protectors was Frederick III, called the Wise, elector of Saxony, who had selected Cranach as his court painter in 1504. In Cranach’s painting, several motifs remain as points of contention among scholars, especially the main winged female figure in the foreground shown sharpening a stick, most likely an allusion to idleness or indolence as conducive to melancholy.
(x)

electronicgallery:

"Die Melancholie" (Melancholy) by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1532

Lucas Cranach the Elder’s Melancholy certainly draws its inspiration from an engraving executed by Dürer on the same subject in 1514. A theme often examined in art works since antiquity, melancholy, or melancholia, derives from the medical theory of four humours, whereby disease or ailments were thought to be caused by an imbalance in one or another of the four basic bodily fluids, or humours. In contrast to its negative connotations during the Middle Ages, this condition was equated during the Renaissance with the artistic temperament. In fact, many considered melancholy to be the catalyst for all artistic creation. Cranach makes use of Dürer’s motifs, but transposes them to illustrate one of Martin Luther’s sermons, which aimed to denounce this ailment as an indication that the afflicted individual was under the influence of Satan. Drink and nourishment were essential to counteract its effects.

More than any other painter of his time, Lucas Cranach the Elder (Cranach, 1472–Weimar, 1553) was heavily influenced by the ideas of Martin Luther, one of whose main proponents and protectors was Frederick III, called the Wise, elector of Saxony, who had selected Cranach as his court painter in 1504. In Cranach’s painting, several motifs remain as points of contention among scholars, especially the main winged female figure in the foreground shown sharpening a stick, most likely an allusion to idleness or indolence as conducive to melancholy.

(x)

July182014
mademoisellelapiquante:

Giampietrino | Madonna of the Cherries  (detail) | 1508-1510

mademoisellelapiquante:

Giampietrino | Madonna of the Cherries  (detail) | 1508-1510

12PM
medievalpoc:

Paolo Veronese
Three Archers
Italy (1558)
Fresco, 270 x 130 cm.
Chiesa de San Sebastiano (Venice, Italy)
[x] [x] [x]

medievalpoc:

Paolo Veronese

Three Archers

Italy (1558)

Fresco, 270 x 130 cm.

Chiesa de San Sebastiano (Venice, Italy)

[x] [x] [x]

July172014

medievalpoc:

Bonifazio de’Pitati (Veronese)

Parable of the Rich Man and the Beggar

Italy (c. 1540-50)

Oil on Canvas, 205 x 437 cm.

Gallerie dell’Accademia di Venezia.

[x] [x]

12PM
renaissance-art:

Giovanni Battista Moroni c. 1570
Portrait of a Little Girl of the Redetti Family

renaissance-art:

Giovanni Battista Moroni c. 1570

Portrait of a Little Girl of the Redetti Family